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Friday, January 05, 2007

Triangle

by Katharine Weber
Rating 4/5
I finished reading this on Dec. 30, but didn't have time to post it until now. I was interested in reading this book because it deals with the horrible Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The approach is unusual, but creative.

Esther Gottesfield, at 106, is the last survivor of the fire. She has told her story on countless occasions, but there are a few discrepancies that raise questions for Ruth Zion, who is a Triangle fire historian. After Esther dies, Ruth shares her theory about Esther with Esther's granddaughter, Rebecca, and her partner, George. Of course, Rebecca and George are upset and search for clues to disprove Ruth's claims.

Intermixed into this story is the one about George and Rebecca. Mostly George, who is a musical composer. George's music is inspired by patterns found in nature, from Sierpinski triangles to human DNA to the Triangle fire itself.

Overall, I'm glad I read this book even though it was somewhat disconcerting at times. Learning about the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory and the fire was very interesting, but sometimes I felt the other parts of story were weird.

18 comments:

BabelBabe said...

this book sounds so familiar, but i am sure i have not read it...it looksinteresting, though.

Framed said...

Did you choose this book because of the author's name? It sounds like one I can pass on. Thanks!

Framed said...

Not the author's name, the book.

Lisa said...

I've been anxiously awaiting your review of this book, since I saw the review in Bookmarks Magazine, and it didn't quite make the cut for my TBR list....I thought if you gave it a raving review, I might add it... But with so many books on my TBR, I guess I'll pass, for now anyway.

Thanks for a good review!

Orange Blossom Goddess (aka Heather) said...

This was a good review. I like how you left us wondering about the theories.

Heather
www.thelibraryladder.blogspot.com

booklogged said...

Babelbabe, maybe you've read a review of it somewhere. It was an interesting book, but I'm not sure everyone would it enjoy it.

You guessed it, Framed. For those of you who don't know, I have a daugher name Kathryn.

Lisa, I know what you mean about there being so many books with great reviews.

Heather, thanks for the compliment. I always feel inadequate when it comes to writing.

Joy said...

Oh! Somebody told me about this book a couple of months ago and I haven't heard about it since. Good to see that you enjoyed it.

SuziQoregon said...

I've been hearing about this one for several months now. It's still on my Maybe list.

Love the snowflakes :-)

Christina said...

I might have to get this one too. I like to read about history expecially in books like this, can you believe I never heard of this.

Sherry said...

I have this one on my TBR list. I may wait a while, though, since I just read two "weird" books.

Library Mama said...

This sounds quite fascinating. Another for my list.

Carrie K said...

It does sound intriguing, even if a bit weird. Using the Triangle fire as a flashpoint is a bold choice. (Why do I feel like I'm in a wine tasting? I always feel so inadequate describing books or why I want to read them. I hate to keep saying interesting, but it does sound interesting!)

Eva said...

I read about the triangle shirtwaist fire disaster as part of my history B.A., a truly horrific event. Sounds like perhaps a more direct account of it may have been a better read for you.

Lotus Reads said...

Hi, booklogged!

I have never heard of the "Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire", you have made me very curious to read more about it, thanks!

Eva said...

My favorite part of The Collector was definitely reading the same story from two perspectives. :)

From the way you wrote the review, I'm surprised you gave it 4/5. What's your ranking system?

And thanks for a warm welcome into the blogging community!

Katharine Weber said...

I have no idea what you mean by "weird" or, for that matter, whether you think a book's "weird"ness is a good thing or a bad thing. Are novels good if the events and people in them are utterly ordinary? Are novels less good if the events and people in them are unusual, surprising, outside your own experience?

booklogged said...

Katharine, I'm tickled that you came to visit my blog. I am not a great book reviewer, I quite often can't put my finger of the correct words or description. Amd I usually don't spend very much time writing these reviews, as they are mostly for my benefit.

I liked Triangle very much and I'm looking forward to reading more of your books.

Lesley said...

I've had this book on my wishlist since seeing it in Bookmarks magazine back in the fall. Now I'm even more intrigued!