Pages

Thursday, November 29, 2007

The Door in the Wall

by Marguerite De Angeli

I decided to read this Newbery Medal book because it won in the year I was born. The theme is presented early in the book when the friar, Brother Luke, leads a young crippled boy around the inside wall of the village. Brother Luke tells Robin that if he ever comes to a wall to just follow it and eventually he will find a door.

Later as Robin learns to whittle and play the lute, and as he strengthens his arm muscles by swimming, Brother Luke reminds him that he is finding doors in the wall. All the doors take effort, but they are there and they lead us past the walls, or restrictions, of our lives.

I hope my grandchildren grow into avid readers. I would like to read this one with them or give it to them when they get a little older. Along with teaching a valuable lesson it depicts the medieval period quite well. I learned that the word window came from the holes in the rock walls of buildings that were referred to as wind holes. I like picking up little tidbits like that in my reading.

11 comments:

Framed said...

I hope Lincoln is a reader also. There's such an interesting world in books. Maybe I'd better get him a book for Xmas. This one looks wonderful for when he's older.

3M said...

I really enjoyed this one as well.

jenclair said...

I'm hoping the same thing--that my grandchildren will be avid readers. The competition of television and video games (and some of both are excellent) can push reading to the side, so getting great books early is a good start to helping them love reading. I like the concept of The Door in the Wall and will keep it in mind.

Literary Feline said...

Oh my goodness! I read this when I was a child; one of favorites, in fact. It's been a while since I've seen it mentioned anywhere.

Princess Haiku said...

I love children's literature and will read this. Thanks for the review. BTW I found you via Chedwick.

Bellezza said...

Please consider joining my Japanese Literature Challenge. The details came be found at:

http://dolcebellezza.blogspot.com/2007/11/youre-invited.html

Stephanie said...

I haven't read this one, but I don't think I've read a bad Newberry!! That is one award that, to me, always gets it right!

Robin said...

I loved this book when I read it as a child, and I've continued to love it each time I've read it aloud to a group of students. It was a perfect read aloud for my 6th graders when we studied the Middle Ages. I think my 11-month old grandson is well on the way to loving reading...he loves to sit on his Dad's lap and read books together!

d. chedwick bryant said...

Why does this sound so familiar, yet I'm thinking I haven't read it?

Oh well. Something to read at B&N!

I have a snow contest at my place, (11/29 post) and wanted you to know I finished 'Bel Canto' Thank you for introducing me to the book, the author... it was good.

Paula said...

This sounds like one we all should read. I like learning the little things that you can pick up in reading as well and teh medieval period holds a special fascination for me. Thanks for another great review!

Carrie K said...

I can't believe I didn't read that one. She won another Newberry Medal for another book later on too.